Journal of Contemporary Issues in Business Research

ISSN 2305-8277
Table of Contents: Vol. 3, Issue No. 1, January 2014 Table of Contents: Vol. 3, Issue No. 1, January 2014

Articles

The Perceptions of and Motivations for Purchase of Organic and Local Foods The Perceptions of and Motivations for Purchase of Organic and Local Foods

Author(s): Andrea K. Ballute 1, and Paul D. Berger 2

Abstract: What are the primary factors that attract consumers to buy organic or locally grown foods? In fact, do consumers know the difference between organic food and locally grown food? Organics have been a hot topic in health and food discussions and recently, locally-sourced foods are garnering increasing attention as well. Continuous economic and health developments encourage these trends. While much has been written about consumer perceptions of organic foods, this study considers the interaction between the definitions and perceptions of these two food classifications. Results are survey-based and focus on students at large college in the northeastern United States. This is a useful subject group, in that the group is viewed as emerging grocery consumers; we inquire about their current purchase habits, the perceptions and motivations for them, and changes they expect in their habits after graduation.

Keywords: Organic food; Locally-grown food; Health food; Consumer behavior Survey-based research.

» About This Article   » Full Text (PDF)   » Permissions   [pp: 1-18]   Article first published online: 2013

Author Affiliations:
  • Ernst & Young, United States 1
  • Bentley University, United States 2
Quality Indicators That Impact the Design and Delivery of Online Instruction Quality Indicators That Impact the Design and Delivery of Online Instruction

Author(s): Pauline Ratnasingam

Abstract: Universities are expanding their resources to be digitally linked, offering convenience to students who are seeking nontraditional way of education a better fit for their busy lifestyles. This study aims to examine quality indicators pertaining to the design and delivery of online instruction and its impact on students learning perspectives and outcomes. Quality indicators pertaining to course structure, course content, course navigation, and course assessments are used to examine their overall experience in taking online course. 110 undergraduate students responded to an online survey questionnaire. The findings indicated that ninety five percent of the students agreed that they received all the relevant information required to complete their assessments and ninety seven percent of them were comfortable in using the technology to submit their assignments. Challenges to online instruction included the impact of physical distance between instructor and student, adapting to the technology, and time management. We argue that it is equally significant to consider factors pertaining to the type, quality, and quantity of information presented to students, as online instruction demands a balance in the use of technology. We provide the lessons learned and recommendations for enhancing the quality of online instruction.

Keywords: Course structure; Content; Navigation; Assessment; Quality indicators.

» About This Article   » Full Text (PDF)   » Permissions   [pp: 19-33]   Article first published online: 2013

Author Affiliations:
  • University of Central Missouri, United States
Maintaining Good Occupational Safety and Health Practices in Organisations: A Review Maintaining Good Occupational Safety and Health Practices in Organisations: A Review

Author(s): Angeline Tay

Abstract: This article highlights some of the causes and costs for not maintaining good occupational safety and health (OSH) practices and suggests some preventive measures to overcome the challenges. The aim is to encourage employers and employees to do all they can to put safety first to minimise financial and personal losses resulting from the permanent disability, mental and emotional stresses, as well as the deaths of employees. After implementing the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1994 (OSHA) for nearly 20 years, much more could be done to enforce the law. The rate of non-compliance need to be reduced and more organisations should be encouraged to provide safer work environment, and to ultimately adopt the more enduring safety culture to minimise the total number of occupational accidents and illnesses in Malaysia.

Keywords: OSH causes; OSH costs; OSH prevention; Malaysian OSHA 1994; Malaysia.

» About This Article   » Full Text (PDF)   » Permissions   [pp: 34-40]   Article first published online: 2013

Author Affiliations:
  • University of Malaya
Potential Sources of Zimbabwe Commercial Banks Illiquidity after Dollarisation Potential Sources of Zimbabwe Commercial Banks Illiquidity after Dollarisation

Author(s): Chikoko Laurine

Abstract: This research presents a comprehensive analysis of Zimbabwean commercial banks potential sources of liquidity risk after the country adopted the multiple currency exchange rate regime (March 2009 to December 2012). A survey research design and documentary analysis were used. Based on the results, commercial banks had problems in sourcing funds. Sources of funds were mainly transitory deposits with little coming from treasury activities, interbank activities and offshore lines of credit. There was no lender of the last resort function by the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe. Some banks struggled to raise the minimum capital requirements. After the dollarisation of the economy, progressively commercial banks took up the lending activity. Locally owned banks were aggressive while foreign owned banks took a passive stance. The banks that were aggressive in lending had problems of non-performing loans especially from the corporate clients, which exposed the banks to liquidity risk. The other potential source of liquidity risk emanated from liquidity risk management by the commercial banks. As much as all commercial banks had comprehensive policies and procedure manuals, some banks were not adhering to them. In addition some banks violated set risk limits. All these were threats to liquidity management by commercial banks in Zimbabwe. The main recommendation of this study is that banks may need to come up with products and devices that encourage clients to have a savings culture. The central bank may not need to be too strict or too relaxed but to be moderate and ensure an enabling regulatory environment. This would facilitate banks to manage liquidity risk and at the same time protect depositors in any challenging operating environment.

Keywords: Zimbabwe; Commercial banks; Illiquidity; Multiple currency; Exchange rate.

» About This Article   » Full Text (PDF)   » Permissions   [pp: 41-51]   Article first published online: October 2013

Author Affiliations:
  • Midlands State University
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